The Student News Site of Paducah Tilghman High School

The Tilghman Bell

The Student News Site of Paducah Tilghman High School

The Tilghman Bell

The Student News Site of Paducah Tilghman High School

The Tilghman Bell

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    Breast Cancer Awareness Month

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    October may be known for its chilly days and spooky decorations, but it is also Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Almost everyone knows someone in their life who has been affected by breast cancer. Breast cancer affects 2.3 million women worldwide and one in eight women in the United States every year. October features countless programs aimed at supporting people who have been diagnosed with breast cancer, have lost someone to cancer, and fundraising for cancer research. This month is also aimed at stressing the importance of regular screenings to help prevent the disease and catch it as soon as possible. Early detection of the disease provides the best chance of a successful treatment and cure. Over 3.5 million breast cancer survivors are alive today because of the advancement in screenings, detection, and treatment.

    Breast Cancer Awareness Month began in 1985 as an awareness campaign by the American Cancer Society which only lasted a week. It eventually was extended into the whole month of October. You might associate Breast Cancer Awareness Month with the pink ribbon, but it wasn’t always pink. A woman named Charlotte Haley gave out peachy-colored ribbons to call attention to the lack of funding for breast cancer research. Charlotte Haley’s sister, daughter, and granddaughter had breast cancer. In 1993, Evelyn Lauder founded the Breast Cancer Research Foundation and established the pink ribbon as the foundation’s symbol. Although, this was not the first time the ribbon was used to symbolize breast cancer. In 1991, the Susan G. Koman Foundation gave out pink ribbons to people in its NYC race for breast cancer survivors.

    If you are interested in getting involved during Breast Cancer Awareness Month, here are some ways you can:

    1. Wear pink! By wearing pink, you can show your support to those who are fighting breast cancer.
    2. Share facts! By learning and sharing what you know you could help spread awareness. Most women never expected to receive a diagnosis until it happened to them. Knowing the risks can help in early detection and make the cancer more treatable. 
    3. Fund Research! Breast cancer research is crucial in the quest to find a cure for breast cancer. Research can also help us find more ways to prevent the disease. 
    4. Participate in a run or walk! Here at Paducah Tilghman High School HOSA is hosting a Breast Cancer Awareness walk. It is October 30th at 3:00 p.m. at McRight Field & Track. It costs $5 to participate. 
    5. Create your own fundraiser! You could host any fun event of your choosing and have the proceeds go to a breast cancer charity. It’s a great way to support a great cause!

     

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    About the Contributor
    Ellie Farley, Staff Writer
    Ellie is a junior at Paducah Tilghman. She is the social media/communications manager for the Student Equity Advisory Council (SEAC), as well as a member of Concert Choir, Concordia, and Interact Club. She is also a Tilghman Student Ambassador and a Student Representative for the Family Resource Youth Services Center (FRYSC) Board. She enjoys spending time with her friends, iced chai, and working at MAKE Paducah.

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